Medical devices mismatch in Southern countries

By: Dinar Kale, Julius Mugwagwa
Funding Body - IKD Seed Corn fund
Funding period - Monday 01 November 2010

Medical devices forms key part of comprehensive healthcare all over the world. However there are key concerns regarding availability and affordibility of medical devices in the developing world. Most of the medical devices are developed and manufactured by firms based in advanced countries targetting customers in similar markets. It creates a mismatch between avalibility and needs of people in poor countries. In this context this project investigates current status of medical device industry in India and to identify key issues creating mismatch between availability and supply of medical devices for local populations. 

Background

Medical device and Pharmaceutical industry forms important industries for containment of healthcare cost and access of healthcare to poor people. Over the last decade the Indian pharmaceutical industry has emerged as a leading supplier of generic drugs to both developing and developed countries while India still imports almost 70% of medical devices from overseas. This creates immense problem for securing access of these devices to much needed poor population of India as well as other developing countries and that forms focus of research on medical device industries in developing countries.

The movement of the Indian pharmaceutical industry along the R&D value chain represents a remarkable shift for from public sector driven to private sector oriented innovation. Indian industry moved from an importer of drugs to imitator of drugs and a major supplier of medicines to other developing and advance countries. The Indian government's industrial policies and adoption of weak regulatory system played a crucial role in shaping development of innovation capability. However compare to success of Indian pharmaceutical industry other crucial sectors in healthcare sector such as medical device industry has not witnessed similar growth. This research proposes to study factors that hampered development in the medical device industry in India.

 

Publications

Journal publications

Harmon, Shawn H. E. and Kale, Dinar (2015). Regulating in developing countries: multiple roles for medical research and products regulation in Argentina and India. Technology in Society, 43 pp. 10–22.

Conference publications

Kale, Dinar (2013). Regulation quagmire, inclusive innovations and arrested development: evidence from the Indian medical device industry. In: 11th Globelics International Conference , 11-13 September, 2013, Ankara, Turkey.

Harmon, Shawn and Kale, Dinar (2012). A view against the grain? The role of regulation in Argentine and Indian bioscience innovation. In: 2nd Joint BISA-ISA International Conference, 20-22 June, 2012, Edinburgh.

Kale, Dinar (2011). In search of missing hand of 'state': the case of the Indian medical device industry. In: The 9th GLOBELICS (Global Network for the Economics of Learning, Innovation, and Competence Building Systems) International Conference: Creativity, innovation and Economic Development, 15-17 November 2011, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Presentations & Events

Kale, Dinar (2013). Regulation quagmire, inclusive innovations and arrested development: evidence from the Indian medical device industry. In: 11th Globelics International Conference , 11-13 September, 2013, Ankara, Turkey.

Kale, Dinar (2011). In search of missing hand of 'state': the case of the Indian medical device industry. In: The 9th GLOBELICS (Global Network for the Economics of Learning, Innovation, and Competence Building Systems) International Conference: Creativity, innovation and Economic Development, 15-17 November 2011, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Kale, Dinar (2010). Comparative analysis of Indian pharmaceutical and medical devices sector. In: Pharmaceuticals in Developing and Emerging Economies: Production, Innovation, and Access to Medicines in the wake of TRIPS, 17 - 19 Sept 2010, Hyderabad, India.

Contact

Dr Dinar Kale

Email: Dinar Kale



The wider DPP environment is collaborative and provides many opportunities for additional training, early publishing, and presentation of work.

Farah Huzair