DPP is the main centre for teaching and research in Development Studies and Development Management at the Open University.

DPP is a major contributor to ID@OU: the Open University’s international development activity. ID@OU brings together research, teaching and programmes in international development across the university.

We focus on:

  • The links between global historical processes and development interventions
  • Research that aims to shape policy and practice
  • Teaching that enables and empowers students to engage actively with the contemporary challenges of development

DPP is the main centre for teaching and research in Development Studies and Development Management at the Open University.

DPP is a major contributor to ID@OU: the Open University’s international development activity. ID@OU brings together research, teaching and programmes in international development across the university.

We focus on:

  • The links between global historical processes and development interventions
  • Research that aims to shape policy and practice
  • Teaching that enables and empowers students to engage actively with the contemporary challenges of development
Students from more than 90 countries.
A global leader in development management teaching
Largest provider of development management in Europe.
On 24th June the Open University celebrated the 30<sup>th</sup> Anniversary of its Development, Policy and Practice Programme (DPP).
Professor Helen Yanacopulos has launched her new book titled 'International NGO Engagement, Advocacy, Activism. The Faces and Spaces of Change'.
Giles Mohan was interviewed on CNBC Africa to discuss his China-Africa research.
Dr Ben Lampert appeared on Arise TV to discuss the impact of increased Chinese migration to Africa and the wider context of China’s heightened engagement with the continent. The discussion drew on his new book Chinese migrants and Africa’s Development, which is published by Zed and was co-authored with OU colleagues Professor Giles Mohan and Dr Daphne Chang, and Dr May Tan-Mullins from the...
Professor Giles Mohan, Open University, UK, lead researcher for a China-Africa project on oil and economic development supported by the DFID-ESRC Growth Research Programme (DEGRP). For more information, visit http://bit.ly/1FK0Gfy
In this clip Prof Joanna Chataway and Prof Maureen Mackintosh discuss Innogen's research on health innovation in developing counties.   
Forum 2012, the 14th edition of the Global Forum for Health Research is underway in Cape Town, South Africa this week (23 to 27 March 2012), under the theme ‘Beyond aid ... research and innovation as key drivers for health equity and development’. There are three main sub-themes for the conference:
What better way to bring to a wide audience the challenges of vaccination in developing countries, than to give a celebrity an ice-box filled with Polio vaccine and tell them to go deliver? The two part documentary “Ewan McGregor: Cold Chain Mission” was broadcast by the BCC on the 22nd and 29th of April 2012.
My recent journeys to Burkina Faso have grossly exposed my inability to converse in the French language.
The 4th Biennial meeting of the Human Variome Project (HVP) at UNESCO in Paris kicked off on Monday 11th June with announcements of some notable achievements. One was the official partnering of the HVP with UNESCO. Another was the signing of an agreement to bring China on board as an addition to the 12 existing country nodes, and the first core member of the HVP.
Vaccines are arguably one of the most successful public health tools for reducing disease and saving lives across the world. This is not new, but attending the World Vaccines Congress in Lyon was a reminder that the story of vaccines is far from over. Everything in vaccines is changing: the locus for R&D and manufacturing, the market, the regulatory framework, and the technology itself. All...
Vaccinomics and Challenges for Developing Countries  What is Vaccinomics?
Notes from the AfricaLics Academy Innovation and Development in Africa Conference, 19th - 30th November, 2012, Moi University, Kenya 1. The People and The Challenges
I do not know whether I should call it innovation or not. Well, to the extent that something new has been done may suffice to give it this label which is becoming increasingly popular particularly amongst academics. If we can call it innovation then it appears providers of public transport services in Nairobi are “over-innovating”. So, what are they innovating and how has this innovation caught...
I’m currently at an energy and international development event in Kenya.  This is the first time I’ve really forayed into the field of energy.  However, I see that its full of examples of potentially inclusive innovations.  There are improved cooking stoves that can be locally made which use less wood or charcoal and produce less emissions.
There are three main ways of getting round Uganda if you do not have your own means of transport—taxis popularly known as special hire in Uganda, Toyota mini bus (Ugandan version of a Taxi) aka ‘Matatu’ in East Africa and motor cycle taxi called ‘boda boda’. The term ‘boda-boda’ comes from the Busia border of Uganda some 50 years ago when innovative Ugandans provided bicycle taxis for bus...
From “Jua Kali” to Toiling in the Mud: The Plight of Informal Woodworkers in Gikomba Market
 ‘Good will’: a tale of two countries By Alexander Borda-Rodriguez
  All’s Fair in Love and War by Farah Huzair Revisiting Sri-Lanka gave me pause for thought on what is apparently an ingrained cultural mindset; that fair is beautiful. In Sri-Lanka and other South Asian countries, ‘fair’ also means pale of skin. And so the adage that ‘fair is beautiful’ has implications for this society, that are paradoxically, anything but fair. 
Mission Possible by Julius Mugwagwa, recently in South Africa and Zimbabwe  Spending a week each in South Africa and Zimbabwe doing a pilot study for my new ESRC-funded project on ‘innovative spending in global health’ from the end of February to early March was indeed an eye and ear opener. For both me and the various people I met and talked to.
Is the Tata Nano an example of ‘inclusive innovation’? What about solar lighting? How do we determine what is inclusive or pro-poor? Is it about the degree of income generation or saving that is created, the degree of viable business opportunity that a new product creates or is it about the process of innovation around the product more generally?
Julius Mugwagwa, recently in South Africa and Zimbabwe
Ungovernable? Biotech and its xerophytic challenges By Julius Mugwagwa, recently in Pretoria, South Africa
The poor and their health needs: hard-to-reach, still? By Julius Mugwagwa
Pitfalls and Benefits of an STS-Africa Network by Prof. Norman Clark Earlier this year, Prof Norman Clark participated in the STS-Africa meeting, ‘Mapping Science and Technology in Africa: Traveling technologies and global disorders” in Johannesburg, South Africa. A main component of the event was around establishing an STS community for sub-Saharan Africa, and Prof Clark reflects on the pitfalls...
Comment Prof. Maureen Mackintosh responds to 'Local pharma in Africa: going nowhere, slowly?'  Julius Mugwagwa, investigating spending on essential medicines in African contexts, wrote:  “one consistent argument is that local production will contribute positively to health system targets, and is thus a good place to spend the ‘health dollars’.  There, however, seems to be contending views on how...
Nepal: Time to Challenge the Crisis Narrative?  By Craig Walker
The future of Development - Aid and Beyond  Myles Wickstead
Richard Pinder, Qualification Director for the MSc in Development Management, looks at some of the ways in which Open University teaching engages with arguably the biggest issue in development: the creation and achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
Pharmaceutical Standards: A Challenging Balancing Act Dinar Kale
Whose Growth? Which Innovation? Theo Papaioannou On July 13, 2015 the Greeks woke up to a new bailout deal that will keep the country in the Eurozone. In return, they will have to implement a new austerity programme that will not only plug the country into an even deeper recession but also will undermine any prospect of development and innovation for the years to come. This is so for a number of...
Can developments in the social economy help address some of the contradictions in a globalised world? Can the social economy foster a new way of thinking about how we do business? What are the challenges for enterprises that have social goals rather than profit at their core?
I have sometimes described Atlanta to my British friends as a ‘hot Milton Keynes’ –very green and suburban, lots of criss-crossing motorways, with a large mall in the centre.  It has blisteringly hot summers – daily highs in July average a humid 32C.  It is special to me personally because my great uncle played for its professional baseball team – the Atlanta Braves - then known as the Boston...
Sitting in a traffic jam with four ambulances nearby, all with blue lights flashing but crawling no faster than me, is a reminder that in this privatised city, having money does not get you to the hospital any faster. Dhaka is a city of 17 million with no metro, few functioning traffic lights, and only 263 municipal buses.
In the wake of the sixth Forum on China–Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) in Johannesburg last month, the focus has been on the high-level trade, aid and investment deals that have emerged. But what is often overlooked in the coverage of FOCAC and the broader intensification of China-Africa relations over the last 15 years is the accompanying rise of more everyday Sino-African engagements engendered by...